HomeEventsOn a Very Sultry Night the Music is Hot – 1st July 2015

MC Henry Campion got the evening off to a fine start with an impassioned “It Ain’t Me (Babe) by His Bobness and a tender version of Christine McVie’s “Songbird”. Next up was accordion player Mike Cole who performed “Not For Joe” and “Horses Brawl”, “Admiral Benbow”, and “South Australia”. Following Mike was Lee Rasdall-Dove. This young man has an amazing voice and writes fine songs beyond his years. He sang “Wasted Love”, “Hope” and “Love, Regret or Sacrifice”. Next we had welcome two newcomers to the club. And once again, young men with incredible talent. Regulars at Bob Long’s nights at the Platform Tavern in Southampton, this was their first trip to the Lymington delta. Calum Thompson & Tom Heppell shouldn’t be able to play the blues this well, but they do! They performed Big Bill Broonzy’s “Key To The Highway”, “Hoochie Coochie Man” by Muddy Waters and “Sweet Home Chicago” by Robert Johnson. At the other end of the scale, a man who quite rightly is a local legend. Graham Kendrick has been part of the Bournemouth area music scene for many years. He sang three of this own songs; “Missing Cat”, “The Old Songs” and “November Hair”. To finish the first half, a local band going places in the folk world, and again, youth is on their side. Chris Bailey (guitar/vocals), Lee Cuff (cello/vocals) and David Hoyland (kahon/ukelele/mandolin/vocals) are Kadia.They played the traditional “The Keeper” and “Just As The Tide Was Flowing”, their own version of “Lady Isabella” combined with “The Moon and the Seven Stars”, and another traditional song, “Captain Ward”. A great end to a fantastic first half.
After the break and raffle, Henry kicked off the second half with Sting’s “Fields of Gold” and blues standard “Route 66” composed in 1946 by Bobby Troup. Following Henry, another newcomer to the club. George Hoy sang “Reason To Believe” by Tim Hardin and “I Wish I Could Shimmy Like My Sister Kate” written by Clarence Williams and Armand Piron, published in 1919 and believed to be based on a bawdy tune by Louis Armstrong about Kate Townsend, a murdered brothel madam! Moving on… ‘Mississippi’ Bob Long then took to the stage and performed Gus Cannon’s “Hand Out”, Will Shade’s “Aunt Caroline Dye” and “Everybody Ought To Make A Change Sometimes” by Sleepy John Estes. Then to finish the evening, Kadia. Their second set included the traditional “Mary and the Silvery Tide”, their own “Silver Linings” and “Beast of Bodmin Moor”, “Raggle Taggle Gypsy”, and, as an encore, and most appropriately, “The Parting Glass” which highlighted their fantastic harmonies.

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